Full Velocity Review- Beware Scam

  • 6

Affiliates of Full Velocity’s bot lost more than 90% of their money during the recent Terra/Luna crypto meltdown.   

Full Velocity bot accounts were swiftly liquidated despite their claims of being able to “thrive in volatile markets.”   

James Ward, the company’s founder, has returned with a new bot.   

Full Velocity’s new bot, which was supposed to go live in mid-May, wasn’t made available to the public until the very end of the month.   

On June 3rd, Ward participated in a webinar to promote Full Velocity’s new bot to current and future investors and affiliates alike.   

Ward calls the new bot a “non-hedge stop-loss bot,” in contrast to Full Velocity’s earlier bot, which he calls a “hedge strategy.”   

It’s a solid performer when it comes to performance. It completely disproves all we know about reality. Looking at the stock market, the financial sector, and banks, this is a fantastic deal. 

On the fee side, Full Velocity has reduced its fees from 30% to 25%. Ward claims that Full Velocity’s new bot “averaged 2.9 percent per week,” although he doesn’t specify how long it was tested for.   

On the first day of the Terra/Luna crash, the bot supposedly generated 0.41 percent.   

This bot achieved, at the time of our liquidation, about 0.41 percent of its daily target. Naturally,   

“What’s stopping this bot from being liquidated?” is a significant concern.   

When it comes to balance use and stop/loss, Ward has an answer for that.   

At any given time, how much of the bot’s trading balance is being utilized is referred to as balance usage.   

When the first Full Velocity bot ran into too much market instability, it was forced to be liquidated.    According to Ward, he believes this time around is going to be different because this is simply testing.”   We’ve worked hard to ensure that you’ll be safe even if the worst happens.” During the whole testing period, this particular bot’s utilization rate peaked at 7.3%. It’s a halt. 

The introduction of /loss aims to limit investor losses in the event of another market collapse.   

“Our goal is to have a nuclear button switch that tells the market, “No, we stop.” We will not lose any more money than that.”   

Using two stages, Full Velocity’s stop/loss is implemented.   

A pause is triggered if overall positions fall by more than 12%, halting all trading activity.   

All trade is halted if that percentage falls below 15%. (presumably pending human interaction).   

Of course, all of this is contingent on the crypto market cooperating. Losses could still be more than 15% if transactions fall by more than 15% in a single hit.   

In spite of this, Ward seemed certain that affiliates would always be able to withdraw at least 90% of their trade balances, no matter what.   

So far, I’ve been able to extract 90% of my money out of this bot in the worst case scenario. However, based on the previous worth and the historical movement of this bot and what it has been able to accomplish, I think you’ll probably see around 95% to 97% of that returned.   

As a result, during Ward’s webcast Q&A session, the topic of profitability with constraints was raised by a participant.   

How is it possible to produce large profits with an average usage rate of only 2.9 percent?   

In response, Ward said: “You raise an excellent point, and I’m afraid that’s a question I’m unable to fully answer, other than to say that the volume of trades taking place inside this bot compared to the other bot will be about… a hundred times greater.”   

With no further details about Full Velocity’s new bot, it’s impossible for me to know for sure whether or not more trades would have made it more difficult to keep up with everything.   

Then comes Ward’s concluding argument: “In the event that you had known To put it another way, you could take your profits any time you wanted; take your commissions any time you wanted; take your principal any time you wanted; and know that in the worst-case situation, you might collect 90%. That, in my opinion, is one of the most appealing aspects of what we do.”   

That Full Velocity is functioning within the legal parameters is what gives me peace of mind.   

A key issue with Full Velocity’s first incarnation, as you’ve already seen, was securities fraud.   

Full Velocity and James Ward are based in the state of Alabama in the United States.   

Investing in Full Velocity’s passive “2.9 percent a week” possibility qualifies as a securities offering. To register with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), a full disclosure of the bot is required to be made.   

The Securities and Exchange Commission does not recognize Full Velocity or James Ward as investment advisers. Furthermore, no specifics concerning the new bot have been made public.   

Who created this? Ensuring that customers have access to an audited trading history   

It’s not enough to say “2.9 percent a week, on average” on YouTube. It’s also illegal.   

That’s what I’d need as a possible investor to feel secure.  In the wake of your previous mystery bot’s collapse, it’s hard to believe that your new bot is “phenomenal,” even if we ignore legalities (which you should never do).

Affiliates of Full Velocity’s bot lost more than 90% of their money during the recent Terra/Luna crypto meltdown.    Full Velocity bot accounts were swiftly liquidated despite their claims of being able to “thrive in volatile markets.”    James Ward, the company’s founder, has returned with a new bot.    Full Velocity’s new bot, which…

Affiliates of Full Velocity’s bot lost more than 90% of their money during the recent Terra/Luna crypto meltdown.    Full Velocity bot accounts were swiftly liquidated despite their claims of being able to “thrive in volatile markets.”    James Ward, the company’s founder, has returned with a new bot.    Full Velocity’s new bot, which…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.