COTP Review- Scam

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After deceiving investors about SMS providers for a long time, COTP has now conceded failure. The answer is yes, to a certain extent.

COTP informed investors earlier today that their funds had been stolen by “hackers!” COTP began misleading investors on or about May 13th.

TRON blockchain congestion was cited as a reason for suspending withdrawals. COTP slowed down with SMS errors when it became evident that there was no traffic congestion at the time. Investors learned that the service provider was encountering difficulties.

It’s more likely that COTP simply postponed providing SMS verification until later than originally planned. Anyone who wished to pay out had to have these verification numbers, which meant that COTP withdrawals stayed disabled.

When COTP informed investors about a hacking effort that occurred at a convenient moment, this was utilized as an excuse for a long period.   

“We were hit by an illegal network on May 22 at 11:05 p.m. US time and received a ransom email from an unknown hacker.   

The site has been rendered inoperable as a result of the attack, and users’ personal information has been compromised.”   

This is a classic MLM Ponzi exit scam, unfortunately.   

A large network security firm was immediately hired to investigate the problems caused by this attack, and work on recovering data has already begun.   

It should take between 3 and 5 weeks to get better.   

Then, after “3 to 5 weeks,” something new comes up, or if COTP’s website is still around at that point, the “recovery process” will be over for months.   

COTP’s Ponzi scheme has collapsed, and investors should be aware of this fact. Nothing can be done to retrieve what was taken from you.

COTP, a daily return MLM crypto Ponzi scheme, was launched this year. The COTP Ponzi scheme has been running since 2019, according to investors, despite the fact that the company’s website only went live at the end of 2018.

At first glance, COTP resembled a Boris CEO Ponzi scheme, thanks to its leadership of an actor and executives from a stock photo company, but it was not Russian-run. COTP was a collection of Southeast Asian con artists who attempted to defraud Boris of his CEO position.

One platform was used by multiple clone Ponzi schemes that have all collapsed (before I could get around to reviewing any of them). I believe that COTP was controlled by Chinese con artists who may have had ties to Singapore.

Whether or not they can compete with the Russians in the actor CEO MLM Ponzi sector is still up in the air.

The COTP website was down at the time of this writing. It didn’t work, and I’m not sure if it’s gone forever. Almost 40% of COTP’s visitors originate from the United States, Colombia, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Nigeria, according to SimilarWeb (3 percent). one-fourth of a percentage point We don’t know how much COTP investors lost unless regulators take action.

Withdrawal requests for COTP investors had to be accompanied by photo identification. The failure of COTP could lead to identity theft in addition to financial losses.

After deceiving investors about SMS providers for a long time, COTP has now conceded failure. The answer is yes, to a certain extent. COTP informed investors earlier today that their funds had been stolen by “hackers!” COTP began misleading investors on or about May 13th. TRON blockchain congestion was cited as a reason for suspending…

After deceiving investors about SMS providers for a long time, COTP has now conceded failure. The answer is yes, to a certain extent. COTP informed investors earlier today that their funds had been stolen by “hackers!” COTP began misleading investors on or about May 13th. TRON blockchain congestion was cited as a reason for suspending…

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