Elevate Pass Review- Scam

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It looks like the elevator pass has collapsed. The ‘Elevate Pass’ website had been down for almost twelve hours at the time of this writing. A DNS configuration error is returned when trying to access the website.

When a website goes down, most people wait a day or two before declaring a Ponzi scheme dead.

Despite the fact that Elevate Pass may perhaps resurface, I’m certain that it has collapsed for a variety of reasons.

“ERR NAME NOT RESOLVED” is the name of the website error. The Elevate Pass domain account has been hacked and the DNS settings have been manually modified.

This occurred exactly eleven months after Elevate Pass’ website domain was registered, according to WHOIS records.

The DNS settings have been tampered with, as evidenced by the error message. Logging in and pointing “elevatepass.net” to nothing causes the “not resolved” error message.

The next piece of information we have comes from Elevate Pass CEO Rafael Cebula, who supposedly communicated with us;  making a domain’s DNS settings null manually is not an error, it’s a purposeful activity, and neither is making a domain’s DNS settings null an error.

Logging back into Elevate Pass’ domain account and making the necessary DNS changes would just take a few seconds. Is there an estimated time of arrival? BS). 

Elevate Pass’ demise seems evident, especially in light of today’s crypto market crash caused by the collapse of the Luna/Terra Ponzi scheme. 

In other words, the website could come back, but that would be nothing more than a reboot. If that happens, I’ll let you know below. Elevate Pass was a cryptocurrency Ponzi scheme with a 200% return on investment.

The scam was run from the United Kingdom by Rafael Cebula. When Cebula became a British citizen in February of this year, he celebrated with a party.

Cebula said earlier this month that he would be departing for Thailand:

It’s reasonable to presume that Cebula’s trip plans have been expedited due to Elevate Pass’s collapse. This will be updated on May 12th, 2022.

As expected, a new domain has been registered for Elevate Pass. Changed: “Google has stopped our domains instead of the “technical problem” explanation.”   

In the meantime, their compliance team has completed a backup solution and connected our server to a second domain.   

The putative suspension’s particular issue has not been revealed. I’m not sure, because registrars normally do not null DNS when suspending domains. It is more common to create an error page. “epass.to” is Elevate Pass’ new domain name, but it doesn’t matter.

When it comes to fraud, Tonga isn’t as awful as.IO domains, but the TLD has a history of being linked to fraud. With the.TO domain, anyone can register without needing to disclose personal information.   

While we work on resolving the elevatepass domain, we wanted to make sure you could access the website once more.   

We knew it could take up to 48 hours to get a response from their team, so we had to act quickly. That’s why I’ll be posting any new Elevate Pass updates here as a backup.

According to Elevate Pass, they were unable to verify the contact information provided by Google and had their original domain taken down. Unfortunately, what you gave cannot be utilized to validate your account details and you will need to submit further papers using the secure form here,

“Google is said to have said after attempting to authenticate Elevate Pass domain owner details.”   

It seems that Elevate Pass would be unable to authenticate the registrant of the domain. There are only a few Ponzi schemes going on here, nothing spectacular.

Despite the lack of SSL, Elevate Pass is still able to operate off of its rebooted domain. CloudFlare’s investors are being told that this is an issue. During this time, they’re using insecure connections to check in and send personal information.

It looks like the elevator pass has collapsed. The ‘Elevate Pass’ website had been down for almost twelve hours at the time of this writing. A DNS configuration error is returned when trying to access the website. When a website goes down, most people wait a day or two before declaring a Ponzi scheme dead.…

It looks like the elevator pass has collapsed. The ‘Elevate Pass’ website had been down for almost twelve hours at the time of this writing. A DNS configuration error is returned when trying to access the website. When a website goes down, most people wait a day or two before declaring a Ponzi scheme dead.…

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